The 71-year old, prestigious Merlin Award winning magician P.C. Sorcar Jr. who still performs tricks in front of audiences all over the globe, is all set to spell his magic on Bollywood. In an interaction with a leading Indian daily, Sorcar shared his thoughts, his love for magic and the commercialism of magic. Sorcar believes that his family did not bother to understand the lucrative viability of the business.

Sorcar said, “We are born into magic. In my case I am magic. We have been doing this for ages. Unfortunately for us Indians, anything foreign is excellent. Show me a better magician than me, right now, name it. I take this as a challenge. In my show when children come in, they get inspired and they all want to be magicians. I do not believe in the market or commercial viability of this. When my father passed away, did I think of market when my father passed away in Japan, I was preparing for my exams in Kolkata then. My father was dead in Japan in the middle of the show. The first thing I did was I told my daddy to sleep well and then I wore his outfit and the show started on the very same evening. Did I think of the market then? They booked me for seven days and it continued for three years. That’s a world record and it’s still on. The show has not stopped and it will not stop”.

The daughter of the man who vanished the Taj Mahal in the year for 2 minutes has taken the family’s legacy forward. Maneka Sorcar shared her thoughts as well. She said, “When they see a lady magician, the initial resistance, I can feel that but it is my responsibility to win their trust,” she said when her father cuts her in saying, “Women are magic themselves.”

Maneka Sorcar shared her thoughts about the influence of the west on our culture and also spoke as to how Wonder Woman came into existence only in 2017. She said, “We talk about the western culture so much. Look at them right now. Right now we talk about Wonder Woman, how long did it take? There was Superman, Spiderman, Batman all men. It took them these many years to come up with a female character without any negative connotations because women wielding that kind of power and taking the center stage is unheard of even in western culture.”

Talking about the Sorcars planning on weaving their magic on the big screen, he says says, “I have made a film called Magic where cinema and magic have intertwined together. Things like that are already there and I have shown it to people but commercially our industry is not well equipped for the same. We are compromising but we will soon be venturing into a bit of both Indian cinema and international. Touchwood.”

Fans of the magicians can finally look forward to the Sorcars appearing on the big screen with a film in the near future.